Blogging through the Alphabet: Adventure Academy

Adventure Academy Review

We’ve been homeschooling for five years now, and in that time, we’ve used and reviewed a number of homeschool books, curriculum, and products.  For this round of Blogging through the Alphabet, I’m going to share our favorite homeschool products through the years.

This post contains affiliate links.

My daughters LOVED ABCmouse.com, but at 9 and 10, they are now to old for it.  Enter Adventure Academy, developed by the creators of ABCmouse.com for kids ages 8 to 13.

About Adventure Academy

Adventure Academy definitely has a video game feel to it and presents in a much different, more mature way than ABCmouse.com.

The program has educational games, and some more fun, video game type activities.

 

Educational Activities in Adventure Academy

When you enter Adventure Academy, you can choose the “wing” of the school that you want to work on.  For instance, there is the Science Wing, the Math Wing, and the Library.

Adventure Academy doesn’t choose a path for you like ABCmouse.com does.  You can choose any activity that you like.  So, if you love science, you can spend as much time in the Science Wing as you’d like.

In each area, there are a variety of activities.

Typical activities include reading books, completing a crossword puzzle, watching a video, or taking a quest.

For the quest, you can click on the teacher, and she’ll give you a quest such as talk to someone, ask someone something, or find things.  For example, in one quest, one of my kids had to go over to a concert stage and play music because a boy didn’t know what made the noise.  A big monster appeared, and she had to play more music to keep the monster happy.

For activities, kids are awarded two type of points–one for spending money and one that helps you advance to the next level.  When you go to the next level, you can get new quest opportunities and gifts for moving up.

More Fun, Social Activities in Adventure Academy

There are plenty of non-academic activities such as going fishing, going shopping, make your avatar do different moves like wave and dance and play the guitar.

Each character has their user name floating above them.  Your child can give others a friend request or accept a friend request for other characters.  When you accept friend requests, you can talk to them and go to their houses.  I’m a bit paranoid about online activities, so I don’t let my girls accept online friend requests.

People with exclamation marks above them are people you can click on and get tasks to complete.  When you complete the task, you get coins.

With the coins, you can buy things at the marketplace.  However, you aren’t allowed in the marketplace until you get into Level 4. In Level 6, you get a house.  Once you have a house, you can buy furniture and decorate.

However, even in this area, there are still academic activities you can complete.  For instance, in the area where the houses are, there are little neighborhood book stands.  You can click on it and find books to read.  Some books are read to you, and some you have to read yourself.

Our kids loved ABCmouse.com and are excited to have found Adventure Academy.  They use Adventure Academy several times a week, and I find it to be a fun, supplemental curriculum for them.

To read more Blogging through the Alphabet posts, click on the link below.

Comments

  1. so nice when you find a program that your children not only enjoy but LEARN from. 🙂

  2. I like that there are quests – that sounds like something most kids who already love video games would like and be familiar with – and I totally understand the apprehension about accepting friend requests. That would be a bit worrisome for me.

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