Finders Keepers by Stephen King: A Book Review

While recovering from foot surgery, I requested a ton of books.  The first one I delved into was Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King, the first book in a trilogy.  While I liked that one, it didn’t hook me like some Stephen King books do.

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But when I delved into the second book in the series, Finders Keepers, I was hooked immediately.

Finders Keepers still features retired Detective Bill Hodges, as did Mr. Mercedes.  The central drama in Mr. Mercedes was an event where a man drove a Mercedes into a group of job seekers waiting in line for a job fair, killing eight and injuring many more.  That event still is in Finders Keepers, but it’s not the central focus.  Instead, one of the men who was seriously injured in the event is featured, along with his family.

Finders Keepers switches back in forth in time between 1978 and 2014.

In 1978, a man and two accomplices rob a famous writer, John Rothstein.  For those who loved Misery, there is definitely an echo of that story line as the lead robber, Morris, is obsessed with the writer, Rothstein, and his books.  Like the character in Misery, Morris’ also not happy with a decision the writer had made in one of his books.  Morris and friends steal cash from Rothstein as well as notebooks containing 18 years of unpublished writing.

In 2014, the story follows Pete Saubers, who is thirteen when the story opens.  Pete’s father was seriously injured when Mr. Mercedes crashed through the job fair line.  After his father’s injury and thanks to serious financial strain, all his parents do is fight.  One day when he’s trying to escape the fighting, Pete takes a walk and finds a trunk.

A few days later he opens the trunk and is shocked by what he finds.

While this story has two distinct tracts–Morris and Pete–in the end, they converge in the most fantastic way.  This is an entertaining thriller that I had trouble putting down.

I give this book 5 out of 5 stars on the Mom’s Plans’ scale.

 

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