How to Save on the High Price of Eggs

4 Ways to Save on EggsEeghads, the price of eggs!

If eggs are a breakfast staple for your family, you can relate.

We like to buy organic eggs, which were higher priced than other egg choices, but now, every type of egg is dramatically more expensive.

While eggs used to be a frugal protein source, that is changing.  Eggs at our local store are running $3.69 a dozen, which is almost .31 cents each.  Sure, that’s still a fairly inexpensive protein source, but the higher cost per dozen can really pack a punch to your grocery budget.

Here’s how we’re trying to lower our egg expenditure, even in the face of higher costs:

Buy eggs on clearance.  Every few weeks, our local grocery store marks eggs that are within a day of their sell by date to .99 a carton.  I snatch up 3 to 6 cartons.  For the most part, I try not to buy eggs for full price.

Freeze eggs.  Did you know that you can freeze eggs?  Yep, you can.

I scramble a dozen eggs in a big bowl and add a dash of salt.  Then, I spray an ice cube tray with non stick spray and add the beaten, raw eggs.  I get about one to two ice cube blocks per egg.  Once they’re frozen, I pop them out of the tray and put them in a freezer baggie.

These can be used to make scrambled eggs (though the texture is slightly different than making “fresh” eggs), or they can be used in bake goods with no taste difference.

Use egg replacements.  Did you know that you don’t have to use eggs in your baked goods?  We deal with egg intolerances that come and go, so I’m used to finding substitutes.  I’ve found that 1/4 cup of pumpkin puree works great as a replacement for one egg in baked goods.  In fact, for the 4th of July, I made brownies with 1/2 cup pumpkin puree as a substitute for 2 eggs.  Once the product is cooked, you can’t taste the pumpkin.

I’ve also read that you can substitute 1/4 cup mashed banana for one egg, but I haven’t tried that yet.

Find new breakfast meals.  You don’t have to have eggs at every breakfast.  We’ve been trying to find replacements like making homemade meat patties, eating more granola instead of eggs, and eating more fruit.

What strategies are you using to offset the high price of eggs?

Comments

  1. The 1st and last tip are a must. But the 2nd and 3rd tip stun me, I didn’t know that for sure. Pumpkin puree and mashed banana instead of eggs? That sounds weird, but glad to know that it works well and don’t smell like we’ve expected.
    Thanks for the super nice tips! Looking forward to your update!

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