2013 Summer Reading Programs for Kids

Bookworm at 18 months looking at his books.

Bookworm at 18 months looking at his books.

 

I find it hard to believe, but my son has just 4 short weeks left of school.  If your kids are like mine, they look forward to summer break but also get bored.  Luckily for me, my son is a voracious reader, but I always like to give him added incentive to read even more.

Several companies make it easy on us parents by creating summer reading programs that encourage our kids to read all summer long.  Reading throughout the summer can help kids avoid the summer slide when students lose skills they learned the previous academic year thanks to the idleness of summer.

Here are some great programs available that we plan to enroll my son in:

Barnes & Noble Summer Reading Program:  Read 8 books and record them in the reading journal.  Then, take the reading journal to your nearest Barnes & Noble and get a free book from the selected books offered.

If you’re looking for book choices, Barnes & Noble also gives reading suggestions for kids by grade.

Sylvan’s Book Adventure:  We participated in this last year, and my son liked it because he got to take quizzes after he read the books and win little virtual prizes.

To get started, go to the site and register.  Then, children read books and come back to take a quiz after they finish the book.  (You may want to check to see if the book has an available quiz first before reading.  A few times last summer my son picked a book that didn’t have a quiz available.)

Then, students accrue points for prizes based on their quiz completion.  Parents can also log in and see their child’s progress.

Scholastic Sumer Challenge:  Kids sign up and then utilizing the reading list based on their age, they begin keeping a reading log.  Every week they can participate in challenges and earn digital rewards.  In addition, their reading time will count toward the Read for the World Record.

I love that this program is available for kids as young as 3!

Junie B. Jones Reading Club Get a starter kit with one copy of Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, activity pages and a membership ID card when you join the Junie B. Jones Reading Club.

Half Price Books Feed Your Brain Summer Reading Program:  In the months of June and July, read 15 minutes a day and keep a log.  Kids need to have parents sign it, and when they reach 300 minutes of reading, they can bring in the log & get Bookworm Bucks.

TD Bank Summer Reading Program From May 6, 2013 to September 30, 2013, kids 18 and under who read 10 books and fill out the reading log will receive $10 in their Young Saver’s account at TD Bank.  This offer is valid for new or existing accounts.

Showcase Cinemas Bookworm Wednesday If you live in Conneticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio or Rhode Island, you’re in luck for this program.  Each week, if a child reads a book and fills out the book report form, he gets to see the Wednesday 10 a.m. movie for free!

Your Local Library:  Don’t forget to see what reading program is available at your local library!  My son will take part in the summer reading program as will my daughters.  My daughters are also taking part in another reading program at the library to read 1,000 books before kindergarten.  (We started in January and are on book #327 now!)

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Comments

  1. We’ll join the library’s reading program again this year. He loves reading books and could easily go through 30 books in the summer. We get a few new books every week from the library for him.

    • It’s so important to develop a love of reading in kids both for their enjoyment and academic success.

  2. I was (well, am) a bookworm, too! When I was about the age your kiddo is in the photo, my mom says I refused to go to sleep without a certain number of books in my crib with me. I suppose it’s no surprise that I jumped on the librarian track. Thanks for including the library on your list! And remember — there can be more than books involved. The internship I worked on this summer was for a summer learning challenge in a large public library — and they are focused on building, science, crafts… all sorts of hands-on fun in addition to reading. Active kids may find a niche in this sort of program that they aren’t getting in the classroom (and wouldn’t find in an old-fashioned library of Sssssssssssssssssssh). And those STEM skills are in great demand at school and eventually in the workforce.

  3. My children were in the Public library summer reading program. In fact, they won the priize for reading the most books. We always encouraged reading by setting the example. When your children see you reading they want to copy you.

Leave a Reply